Video Art

From Wikipedia:

Video art is an art form which relies on moving pictures in a visual and audio medium. Video art came into existence during the late 1960s and early 1970s as new consumer video technology became available outside corporate broadcasting. Video art can take many forms: recordings that are broadcastinstallationsviewed in galleries or museums; works streamed online, distributed as video tapes, or DVDs; and performances which may incorporate one or more television setsvideo monitors, and projections, displaying ‘live’ or recorded images and sounds;.[1]

Video art is named after the original analog video tape, which was most commonly used recording technology in the form’s early years. With the advent of digital recording equipment, many artists began to explore digital technology as a new way of expression.

This thing called the camera, that takes everything in equally, taught me a lot about how to see.

One of the key differences between video art and theatrical cinema is that video art does not necessarily rely on many of the conventions that define theatrical cinema. Video art may not employ the use of actors, may contain no dialogue, may have no discernible narrative or plot, or adhere to any of the other conventions that generally define motion picturesas entertainment. This distinction also distinguishes video art from cinema’s subcategories (avant garde cinema, short films, or experimental films, etc.).